Now that all major and minor political parties have chosen their presidential nominees, there’s no doubt that virtually everyone is yearning for “change.” While it seems that Campaign ’08 is about nothing but change, this concept is hardly new as a political goal. Every election to some extent advocates change. It’s just that we don’t always hear it from virtually every side.


 

 


Now that all major and minor political parties have chosen their presidential nominees, there’s no doubt that virtually everyone is yearning for “change.”


While it seems that Campaign ’08 is about nothing but change, this concept is hardly new as a political goal. Every election to some extent advocates change. It’s just that we don’t always hear it from virtually every side.


As much as the candidates talk about how they will bring about change, our democratic process has taught us a hard lesson: Change will never occur in our governmental/social policies unless “we the people” initiate it.


Grass-roots activists can scream all they want about the need for a change in what natural resources we use for energy and how we obtain it. But until more Americans alter their behavior regarding energy use, elected officials will rarely pay a tad more than lip service to the growing crisis.


How we use energy also directly affects our environmental policies. A nation that is so slow to grasp the urgent need for conservation will give Beltway bureaucrats no incentive to push the legislative agenda in this area.


Violent crimes will not decrease by any significant margin simply because new laws are passed. Communities will become safer only when most of the residents decide that what’s happening around them is no longer tolerable.


So Charles Baldwin, Bob Barr, Alan Keyes, John McCain, Cynthia McKinney, Ralph Nader, Barack Obama and John Joseph Polachek can talk all they want about “change.”


If you need to speak to someone who has the real power to make a difference, look in the mirror.


Suburban Life Publications