EDITORIALS

Food issues deserve attention

Editorial board

THE ISSUE: Last Monday was Food Day.

WHAT WE THINK: We live in the most prosperous nation on Earth. Yet, many of our citizens go hungry. Our children are growing obese. Diabetes is on the rise. Food is an issue.

The Huffington Post on Oct. 24 carried an article by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.). They wrote of the importance of Food Day.

The day had escaped our notice. That is too bad. The idea behind it brings up important issues — promoting improved nutrition and health, lessening hunger, increasing access to safe and healthy food, enhancing opportunities for farm families and rural communities

in producing food, conserving natural resources and protecting the environment.

The two spoke of our food and agricultural system as a gift that has kept on giving.

“We Americans today are, in general, able to consume more food, with more variety and convenience, more suited to our individual tastes and costing a lower share of our incomes than ever before in human existence,” Harkin and  DeLauro wrote.

One does not have to follow the same political path as Harkin or DeLauro to agree with what they said above. The issues behind Food Day are important issues, especially here in the Tri-County Area.

We live and work in the “Breadbasket of the World.” But, how often do we look out our car windows at corn and soybean fields and think about the struggles of the farmer growing those crops?

How often do we think about those working at food banks struggling to provide the food so needed by a growing number of our citizens?

How often do we think about nutrition?

The answer: not often enough.  

In recent weeks farmers have been harvesting corn and soybeans. The numbers are not in yet on harvests, but we can rest assured they will top anything seen a generation ago.

We live on top of the most fertile ground in the world. But, how much attention do we pay to it?

We live in the most prosperous nation on Earth. Yet, many of our citizens go hungry.

Our children are growing obese. Diabetes is on the rise. Food is an issue.

Conservation of our precious soil is an issue. Sustaining the family farm is an issue. Nutrition is an issue.

These are all issues right here in our backyard. Are we paying attention?

Well, we here at the Chillicothe Times-Bulletin are now, a week late. What about you?