TO PONDER



Listening to the folks at Voices for Illinois Children one vividly sees the situation for many Illinois children is dire. A report from the organization states Illinois children, overall, are caught in a “budget crossfire at both the state and federal levels, while policy makers are neglecting long-term investments in children.”


TO PONDER

Listening to the folks at Voices for Illinois Children one vividly sees the situation for many Illinois children is dire. A report from the organization states Illinois children, overall, are caught in a “budget crossfire at both the state and federal levels, while policy makers are neglecting long-term investments in children.”

Kathy Ryg, president of Voices for Illinois Children, said, “In this pivotal election year, we hear candidates talk about the economy and budget deficits, but who is talking about the impact on children? It’s clear that we must make the issue of public investments in children a high priority on the candidates’ agendas. Even as the state faces budget shortfalls, we shouldn’t create deficits in children’s life-chances.”

The flip side of that argument is that when lawmakers address the state’s paralyzing debt they are looking out for the future of children and everyone else. Bottom line is: There are no easy answers.  

One can say by increasing spending for children’s programs in the short-term the debt problem becomes worse long-term.

One can also say that by cutting spending for children’s programs the debt situation gets better short-term and long-term if legislators hold tightly to the money purse.

Which way makes sense to you?