The growth of the village of Dunlap is showing no sign of stopping.


The recent census figures have Dunlap at 1,386 residents, a 49.7 percent increase from the 926 residents reported in 2000.


The growth of the village of Dunlap is showing no sign of stopping.

The recent census figures have Dunlap at 1,386 residents, a 49.7 percent increase from the 926 residents reported in 2000.

“The numbers were pretty close to what we had planned,” village president Jack Fennell said. “We did a count five years ago and it followed the lines pretty closely.”

The rate of growth was the highest in Peoria County.

Fennell attributed this growth to high quality water and the school district.

“One thing in Illinois with small communities that hinders building new homes is high-quality water,” he said. “About 10 years ago we invested in getting good water. Also, with an outstanding school district it became a good district to move into.”

Most of the growth in Dunlap can be attributed to the Copperfield subdivision, which currently has 300 houses.

Except for American Indians and Alaskan Natives, every race saw growth in Dunlap.

“We’re becoming a little more diverse village as we grow, which is good,” Fennell said.

Another area that saw growth in the village is the number of houses.

After having only 312 houses in 1990, and 350 in 2000, there are now 505 houses, a growth of 44.3 percent over 2000. Out of those, 490 are occupied.

Fennell said that out of the 15 not currently lived in, one may need a little work, but the rest of which were just moved out.

Currently, Fennell and the village board are meeting with the library, school and business groups to try and plan the next 20 years in the village.

“We’re really in the developing stage now for more subdivisions,” he said. “We’re also key on developing bicycle trails and walking paths between subdivisions.”

In the future, he estimates the village will get about an extra 450 residents and 110 new buildings.

“I think the majority of families are looking for a community with a good, quality school district,” Fennell said.